Training for life on the Ice (Sept 2018)

Katie Joy | 01 Oct 2018

Fieldwork in Antarctica is a massive logistical and human challenge – from getting scientists to the continent, ensuring that they are trained to go out into the middle of the continent, and actually living and working on the ice, it takes a vast number of highly trained people. Fortunately, BAS are really good at this and have an amazing bunch of people that we are working with – from their Cambridge headquarters, on the bases we will visit and into the field.

To help get us prepared for our upcoming trip Geoff and I joined the new BAS staff for pre-season training. During our four-day intensive course we met a wide range of people from vehicle mechanics, chefs, science support crews, boat swains, base managers and field guides, seal and penguin tagging and monitoring teams, doctors – many of whom have signed up for an amazing 18 month stints down on the ice. We also met some of the other science crews who in the 2018 austral season will be undertaking deep ice drilling and hot ice drilling operations to study past climate on the continent, and others who are studying seal populations on South Georgia Island to understand communities and breeding patterns.

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Locations of the BAS bases [Image: BBC]

The training was split into several sessions. First up was and introduction to BAS history, operations, science and practice: BAS operate out of five bases – Rothera, on the peninsula, Halley, on the eastern side of the Weddell Sea, Bird Island and King Edward Point on South Georgia island and  Signy island. People on the bases, on the ships and in the field undertake different science projects – some (like ours) are very seasonal, some run all year round. We got a chance to hear from BAS scientists who run some of these longer term projects,  looked around the Cambridge BAS building and met people who run the archive facility, ice core storage facility and the geology prep and rock stores.

We also got a chance to try on our field kit and check that it all fitted – from insulating boots (very important to get the size and fit right), through to thermal underwear, outer layers and woolly hats – everything was reviewed and items swapped out as needed.


BAS issued polar insulating boots and field kit bags

The last couple of days focused on an intensive and rapid introduction to medical situations and protocols. The polar medical office (British Antarctic Survey Medical Unit ) is run out of Plymouth NHS Hospital and the team travelled up to Cambridge for the training event. In small groups we ran over recognition of life signs and medical problems through to how to bandage up a broken limb, deliver an injection (into an orange!), learn about pain relief options, and about mental health in remote, often stressful, environments. The course were rounded off by undertaking practicals where actors delivered a series of medical scenarios for our group to try and deal with (imagine fending off an imaginary seal whilst trying to deal with someone with a broken leg – that sort of thing…).  Frankly I hope that I never have to put anything I learnt as part of the sessions into practice – but it was an incredibly useful quick fire overview of what to do and how to relay information with people back on station and back in Plymouth if needed.

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Geoff and Katie practising how to get out of a Scott polar tent without creating a medical emergency

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For further information:

BAS science projects https://www.bas.ac.uk/science/our-research/research-projects/

BAS fieldwork https://www.bas.ac.uk/polar-operations/life-in-the-polar-regions/camping-and-deep-field-working/

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