What we are up to in Antarctica…

Katie Joy | 30 Nov 2019

If you have been following the blog for a while then hopefully you will have seen the growth of our Lost Meteorites of Antarctica project from its infancy through to having a team of four people deployed to search for meteorites in Antarctica. If you are new to the blog (welcome!) you can read down the a couple of posts ago to see Geoff’s overview of the season’s plans and how we got here for some background…

The Lost Meteorites project team 2019-2020 season: from left Katie, Romain, Geoff and Wouter rubbing the Magellen’s foot in Punta Areas for good fortune in fair weather!

The Lost Meteorites of Antarctica project is an interdisciplinary science investigation bringing together mathematicians, electronic engineers, cold weather specialist engineers and meteoriticists (scientists who study meteorite samples), working with a large team of amazing people at the British Antarctic Survey to help support us and deploy us out to our field site. You can find out more about the team here. Currently four of us (Geoff, Katie, Wouter and Romain) are based at Rothera Research Station, the British Antarctic Survey’s largest crewed station in Antarctica getting prepared to get out to our field site (more about life on the station in the next couple of posts).

You can find out more about the science of what we are up to by heading over to the Science tab and about the science of meteorites here (what do we hope to find from all the rocks we collect?). Having already recovered tens of meteorites (we estimate 36 at this stage*) from the surface of the ice last field season, the challenge is on to collect more this time around as well as trying to locate iron-rich meteorites that are buried within the ice.

Location of Rothera Research Station in relation to the South American peninsula and Punta Areas in Chile; our departure city.

Thanks to those at Rothera who are taking good care of us — from the chefs who are cooking plentiful amazing meals, to our field guides Taff and Rob who have been helping get our kit together and train us for what to expect, the doctors training us in field medical techniques, the field and science operation leads Al and Maz who are working hard to put together the logistics to get us out to the field and are drawing on the skills of weather observation and forecast teams to help understand when the weather is a go for launch…

We likely have about another week or so here on station to get our metal detection system checked out and to finish off our training before we transfer out to the field (although as always, with Antarctica field campaigns, anything is controlled by the weather, so we will wait and see what happens…).

** more on what we found last season later on… Our team back in the UK are working hard to prepare and classify the samples as the team down here are working on finding them more rocks to play with!

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