A productive few days out and about

Katie Joy | 16 Jan 2020

Although most of the team are now heading north back to the UK, Taff and I are still working hard at our field site and it’s been a productive and busy few days out in the field as we wrap up the season with some surface meteorite searching on two of the ice fields that we visited last year. Revisiting sites is interesting as some of our old tracks are still preserved as imprints in the snow patches like fossilised tracks, indicating past exploration. Both areas are much clearer of fresh snow now than last year (though they still have some thicker patches of older snow), and as there has been less wind it has been pleasant getting out and about and systematically covering the ground to try and find as many samples as possible.

Meteorite sample encased within ice. Just the top portion was poking out and we had to dig the rest of the sample out. [Credit: Katie Joy]

We managed to collect seven samples on the 14th (including a nice big one spotted from about 100 m away), two samples yesterday (rewards for a lot of driving around getting frustrated that we weren’t finding much), and four more today on the 16th (including a nearly completely ice submerged sample), bringing the total number of meteorite stones collected to 82 from this area in total from this year. Several meteorites found over the last few days have been stunning — really nice flight shaped stones preserving evidence of the orientation they travelled through Earth’s atmosphere. A couple others have very fresh fusion crusts suggesting they might be recent falls, and some have hints of pale coloured interiors which look different from the normal chondrite type (primitive asteroid) of samples that we most commonly collect.

We are not sure how many more days we will have in the field as we now await a break in the weather for a plane to travel over from Rothera to collect us — but tea supplies and moral levels are high, and we will keep getting out searching until before our skidoo petrol runs down. Then we will drink some more tea and reflect on a great end to the season.

Cracking ice – as the ice field extends and the ice speeds up it cracks and twists into small faults a few cms wide. We don’t typically find meteorites in areas like this, but sometimes have to drive past and it is like a structural geology lecture in action. [Credit: Katie Joy]
Taff pointing the way to the stunning meteorite (a whole stone) we found today with a rollover lip. [Credit: Katie Joy]

PS Thanks to our Sledge Victor teammates Romain, Geoff and Wouter, and quizmaster K for the amazing sausage roll song rendition over skeds. We didn’t think you would deliver, but you didn’t fail us. Quite magnificent. Who knew there were so many verses to get through. We hope that your travel back to the UK goes well, and see you back Manchester way. 119 is a lot cleaner without you. 🙂

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