Arrival at Rothera

Katie Joy | 27 Nov 2019

The four person team all successfully arrived yesterday in Rothera, the British Antarctic Survey’s largest research station. We flew in with other summer visitors on the Dash 7 aircraft, a flight of about 4.5 hours from Punta Arenas at the southern tip of Chile. The flight over the Southern Ocean was pretty cloudy, but we got a good view of the bay surrounding Adelaide island, where Rothera is based. We could spot elephant seals lounging on the icebergs and sea ice below. After some arrival briefings, we found our rooms and met up with our field guide, Taff, who will be leading our fieldwork. 

The view east from Rothera Point towards Lauberf Fjord [Credit: Katie Joy]

We have spent much of today training — from how to take meteorological observations to help the pilots understand field cloud and visibility conditions (note this is meteorology, that is what the weather is doing, not meteoritics, the study of meteorites!), through to how to take care of ourselves in the cold, and safety around aircraft. Wouter and Romain have undertaken an introduction to fieldwork and are camping out tonight on the slopes above the base to test their putting-up-a-tent skills and, for them, to get their first experience of remote fieldwork food (more from them tomorrow). The weather today is stunning — the temperature is just below zero, the sky is blue and the wind is low, so hopefully they should have a peaceful first night out. In the meantime, Geoff and I have been meeting with the field ops managers to discuss the plan for getting us, and all of our kit (we have a lot of it), out to the field. It’s a complex task for the team here to plan how to deploy aircraft in changeable weather situations for us and other field teams operating in the remote field this season. We have started unpacking the cargo boxes we sent down earlier in the summer to check the condition of the metal detector equipment. The plan for the next couple of days is to get everything tested, both the electronics for the detection system and the towing apparatus for dragging the detector panels over the ice, pack it all up again, and prepare our cargo manifest to help plan the field transfer.

Geoff checks the cargo has arrived safely [Credit: Katie Joy]

Busy, Busy, Busy

Andy Smedley | 20 Aug 2019

It’s been a bit quiet on the blog over the summer, but behind the scenes preparations are well and truly underway for the upcoming field season. We’re all working towards a shipping date at the end of the August so that the equipment can be in Antarctica for November. The metal detecting electronics have been revised, curation kit assembled, risk assessments completed, packing is imminent and we’ve been going through a final couple of rounds of field testing.

The field site we use in the Peak District is close to a pleasant, but relatively unknown, town called Whaley Bridge. Unknown, that is, until the other week, when for a few days it become national headline news. As residents were evacuated due to the threat of the potential collapse of the Toddbrook Reservoir dam, the town was shut down while emergency repairs were carried out. This led to the rather surreal experience of carrying out field work as a Chinook helicopter passed back and forth dropping aggregate and sand bags to stabilise the dam.

Considering that a couple of the project team members houses are directly downstream and right next to the river, our field site provided a useful vantage point to find out whether their houses would be inundated!


Click to listen to Geoff’s thoughts


Field testing in Whaley Bridge.
Final adjustments to the electronics.
An unusual view from the field site — a Chinook approaches the damaged Toddbrook reservoir dam.
The Chinook prepares to drop sandbags to stabilise the dam.

Farewell Svalbard

Geoff Evatt | 18 Mar 2019

Hello, and hopefully soon, goodbye, from Svalbard. I say this as our return flight back to Longyearbyen has just been cancelled due to the gale-force blizzard going on outside the door… (If we fly tomorrow instead, then things should still be OK for returning to the UK — apologies if any of my lectures are missed as a consequence!).

Long evenings. [Credit: Geoff Evatt]
A view across Kongsfjorden; in the foreground the airship mast used during the 1926 Norge expedition to the North Pole. [Credit: Geoff Evatt]

Anyhow, we’ve had an excellent trip, and been looked after brilliantly by the base manager Nick (thank you!). The present weather aside, we’ve had an fantastic run of things, where we’ve been out conducting field trials for 8 days solid with our metal detector array. Only on the last afternoon did the the storm start to come in, just whilst we were clearing the test site up, which added a thrill to things. I think we’re now in agreement that the system will likely detect 100 gram iron meteorites down to 20 cm in real-time, and finding smaller and/or deeper objects will require post-processing back in the tents after a day’s searching (in so doing, we won’t be distracted by the system constantly pinging due to background noise, and we’ll only get off the skidoos to investigate the largest signals). Should we locate iron meteorites much larger than 100 grams, then we’ll also find them in real-time at much deeper depths. This is all testament to our engineers Liam, Wouter and John, who have designed, built, and tinkered with the system over the past couple of years, and who are likewise trapped with me in the Arctic base.

Manual labour to start the day. [Credit: Geoff Evatt]
The northern lights or aurora borealis. [Credit: Geoff Evatt]
Reindeer in front of the Kronebreen glacier. [Credit: Geoff Evatt]
The Svalbard 2019 team.

As you will see from the images, the bitter cold we’ve had for most of the trip has been tempered by the stunning conditions. And the northern lights we saw two nights ago really capped the trip off well. As for wildlife, then only reindeer and seals this year, with no polar bears for distraction. That said, having the BBC’s Today Programme up here acted to keep us continually interested in what was going on around us, and many thanks to them for putting together their news-piece on our project, which can be listened to here:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p073j631

Liam and I were particularly pleased about this, as it’s not often two New Mills residents feature so prominently on the news! And in case you are interested, my project colleagues back in the UK, Andy and Dave, plus myself, set four of the Arctic-themed “Puzzles for Today” this week, which can be found here (puzzle numbers 434-437):

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p063yhf0

It’s strange to think that the next time the system will be used in the cold will be down in Antarctica, where discussions as to exactly where we head to, and how much area we’re likely to search, are now well underway. In the mean-time, further equipment tinkering and engineering will commence back in Manchester, where the big deadline for shipping things South is mid-August.

All-in-all, we now have the two key components of the project together: we know where on the continent to search, and we have built the equipment capable of detecting englacial iron meteorites. The proof of whether they are actually lost within the ice, will now be in the pudding!

Goodbye Svalbard. [Credit: Geoff Evatt]

Svalbard: an unusual field trial

Geoff Evatt | 14 Mar 2019
Hello from Svalbard [Credit: Geoff Evatt]

Good evening from 79º North (more informally: that’s very far North). It’s freezing. Proper freezing: –20ºC air temperature, plus a hint of moist wind, and with a sun barely popping over the surrounding mountain tops. And just before I left the house to fly here (whilst doing my last-second packing), I realised that I had left most of my thermal clothes on a washing line down in Antarctica in January……..

The view on arrival at Ny- Ålesund [Credit: Geoff Evatt]

Anyhow, things are progressing here in somewhat a slightly unusual manner. This is because we have a team from the BBC working from here as well (for the Today programme on Radio 4), who are darting around  compiling stories about research and life conducted up here. And also because there is a team from the UK Research Councils who are also darting around, making sure the BBC people don’t slip up — in both senses. It’s great and fascinating to have the BBC guys here, who have shown genuine interest in matters, and we’re utterly impressed by how hard they work. As we await for the programme’s live broadcast tomorrow morning, where some tedious Brexit story will likely supplant our (we like to think) far more interesting meteorite story, we do have the consolation prize that we’ve set the last two Puzzles for Today on their programme.

Liam, John and Wouter setting up the metal detectors [Credit: Geoff Evatt]

As for the meteorite project: things are going rather well (I say this even as John, Liam and Wouter stand 2m away from me studying a severely broken metal detector). This is because we’re getting excellent and repeatable results from our main metal detector, where we’re ‘seeing’ objects being detected in real time at the depths we hope to find the meteorites, across a range of skidoo speeds. The one big caveat however is that ‘down’ South we’ll be searching over solid glacial ice, whereas ‘up’ North we’re testing over soft fresh snow. The former has the potential to give more vibrations to the system than the snow, and, if not accounted for,  has the potential to swamp meteorite signals.


Svalbard reindeer (Rangifer tarandus platyrhynchus) [Credit: Geoff Evatt]

As for the wildlife? There’s a couple of Svalbard reindeer hanging around the camp, but the Arctic foxes from last year seem to have moved on. Maybe this will change shortly, as sunlight is increasing by almost 25 minutes a day at the moment!

We’ll be back in touch with the latest Brexit, I mean meteorite, update, later in the week.

Svalbard: first day in the field

— Liam Marsh | 09 Mar 2019

Today has been a busy day for the team here in Svalbard. We were accompanied by Henry Burgess from the NERC Arctic Office as we spent out first day in the field setting up the test site for the next few days of testing. The test area is approximately six times larger than the one we used when we were here last year; this time we have an overall track length of around 200m, and a width which is capable of accommodating three panels.

The test site near Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard [Credit: Liam Marsh]

We have placed 20 dummy meteorites at seven different depths throughout the test area, which is sufficient for testing one detector. As the trial continues, we will place a further 19 which will allow us to test all three. Each pair of flags/poles in the image below represents target locations, which have all been carefully positioned and buried (some requiring quite a lot of excavation!) It was slow going, and hard work, but thankfully here on Svalbard there is always a very nice view waiting when we get the chance to look up and enjoy it.

Tomorrow morning we will be getting the equipment outside for the first time. We will be accompanied by the team from BBC Radio 4’s Today Programme, who are here to find out about NERC, BAS, and the UK’s involvement in Arctic research; including the Lost Meteorites of Antarctica. We plan to test a single detector, with the main aim of determining the sensitivity of the detector to the dummy meteorites, characterising the vibration associated with dragging the detector system, and testing of the user interface.

‘Dummy’ meteorites before being buried at the test site. [Credit Wouter van Verre]

Tomorrow evening we expect to be joined by our University of Manchester colleague, and Lost Meteorites PI, Geoff Evatt. Sadly for him, if all goes to plan he will arrive to find us having completed a full set of measurements and facing a day indoors processing all the data. As the week progresses there will be plenty more work to do as we tweak the system and scale up to the three detectors that we have with us.

Svalbard: indoor testing of the detector system

Liam Marsh | 09 Mar 2019

On day two of our time here in Ny-Alesund we have been making good progress. Much of the morning was taken up with further administration, covering both firearms training and coordination of the testing plans and media coverage of the activities taking place here at the NERC base. We did get time to conduct a small amount of testing or the response of two of our three metal detectors with meteorite surrogates, and the initial results were looking promising. We also undertook a significant amount of indoor vibration testing, which the system dealt with better than we had expected; this produced so much banging and crashing that the BBC Radio 4 Today team became curious of what was going on and stopped by for a brief interview.

When we resumed testing in the afternoon we experienced some difficulties in integrating the three detectors. It took a few hours but we managed to make the necessary software tweaks to get the hardware to behave properly. As we reach the end of the day we are at the stage where all three detectors are operational, and we have some initial configuration for outdoor testing of the system.

Tomorrow morning (Sunday) we intend to go out into the field to set up the test site, and all being well (after some further minor tweaks tomorrow afternoon) we should be heading out for some initial detector testing on Monday morning.

Monday Morning

Geoff Evatt | 26 Jan 2019

Arriving back in the UK, here’s some final thoughts on this year’s field season – plus a peaceful soundscape from the Antarctic peninsula. Recorded with binaural headphones / microphones, I encourage you to find a quiet room to get the best listening experience.


Click to listen


And here’s the soundscape:


Click to listen


Seals and icebergs at Rothera [Credit: G W Evatt]

Into the Sky-Blu

Geoff Evatt | 13 Jan 2019

An audio update of happenings and preparations in Rothera before a hopefully imminent departure to the British Antarctic Survey base at Sky-Blu.


Click to listen [1m 37s]


A seal soundscape: recording the grunts, growls and other sounds of the local wildlife neighbours!


Click to listen [3m 08s]


And a photo reel of the last couple of days at Rothera …

Through the keyhole: a particularly impressive iceberg
lying just offshore of The Point, where the audio was recorded [Credit: G W Evatt]
Pre-departure preparations: our campsite made during field training [Credit: G W Evatt]
Good morning: morning view from the camp site [Credit: G W Evatt]
More penguins: still no dancing [Credit: G W Evatt]
Mike wonders how it’ll all fit into a Twin Otter [Credit: G W Evatt]
Geoff wonders how it’ll all fit into a Twin Otter [Credit: M C Rose]

Training time around the station

Katie Joy | 24 Dec 2018

The weather is mild — hovering around 0°C — and the weather has been a mix of cloudy with some light snow and beautiful sun today.  Depending on weather and plane operations there is a plan to try and get Julie and I out to the field towards the end of this week, and so get ready for departure to the field I have to undergo several training sessions to learn how to been in a BAS field party.

IMG_2712v2
Pyramid tent up and snow cat

Last night we took a snow-cat vehicle and went up to the top of a hill close to reptile ridge and  spent the night camping out to test out the field p-box (personal kit bag — there are a lot of acronyms to learn) and how to put up and take down the orange pyramid tent we will be using for our field stay. We have nice warm thick down sleeping bags and a thick set of mats to protect us from the snow below. As it is 24 hours of sunlight here, we need face masks to sleep well – I need to do a bit of practising with mine so that it doesn’t try and slide off my face at night. We will be using primus stoves for cooking and a tilly lamp for heating the tents – I haven’t used either of these before (last time I saw a tilly lamp I think was when I was in the Scouts…) so will take a bit of practice to use mentholated spirits to heat up the element that vaporizes kerosene. These systems are BAS field camp tried and tested, and require little fuel (good for light weight field party travel) and only simple maintenance.  The night past quickly — it was still and quiet up on the hillside outside of station – and we made it back for a late breakfast.

20181223_164025v2
Learning the ropes

Later on I did my snowmobile induction training, learning to drive the different types that BAS use and try out driving on a range of slopes. I haven’t driven on one for about 6 years, but was easy to remember what to do and great to wizz along on the snow (it will be a lot bumpier on the blue icefields we are heading to as the surface is scalloped by the wind). Julie and I did some ropework practice on a local snow slope for how to rescue people from crevasse situations — setting up safety belay points, pulley systems and different types of anchors using snow stakes and ice axes. I have been practising taking out the GPS on all these trips to record the travel so that I am prepared for collecting our in field tracks and ground cover. I am pleased to say (thanks to Andy’s training and patience back in Manchester) that I seem to be able to operate the thing ok and get the data safely into my mapping software to plot out the travel — a small victory!

20181224_114406v2
Looking under the hood – learning what the snowmobile engine looks like and how to check for oil and fuel levels

Tomorrow, Christmas day, is a holiday here on station where all the staff get a chance to relax and eat a big meal (the food here is plentiful and really tasty) so a chance to relax in between training and packing preparations.

Finalising the field procedures

Katie Joy | 13 Dec 2018

We have done a final run through of the metal detector electronic assembly system that connects up to our five detector panel array. Practice makes perfect and it is much easier to do a dry run through in the electronics lab in Manchester before getting to the cold and windy field site. Liam, John and Wouter (our fab electronic engineers) carefully ran Geoff and Mike through which cables to connect to which connector so that the instrument powers up in the right order in the field (marginally less complicated than booting up the Apollo 13 command module), and the procedure has been documented.

Andy and Katie have been working hard finalise our fieldsite maps and ensure that our GPS system is working well for logging our skidoo tracks and meteorite collection locations.

Our fieldwork is nearly upon us – Katie heads out next Tuesday on the 18th December and Geoff in the New Year.