Sledge Victor Over and Out

Katie Joy | 21 Jan 2020

The last few days have been somewhat manic to say the least. A final search on the 17th Jan didn’t yield any more meteorites, though we finished off the southern ice field and could put the doos (skidoos) to bed.

End of season thumbs up selfie from the two remaining Sledge Victor field party members (Katie in the stormtrooper mask at left, Taff in his duck beak mask at right). [Credit: Katie Joy]

A weather window then opened up across the Ronne Ice Shelf meaning that a plane was quickly dispatched from Rothera to come out to our field site at Outer Recovery to collect fieldguide Taff and I. We had a busy day of packing up camp, building and finalising the depots to be left over the Antarctic winter, sorting out all the kit to be brought back to Rothera.

Evening sun at our field site just before we broke camp. [Credit: Katie Joy]
Kelvin-Helmholtz clouds forming in the area, indicative shearing winds. [Credit: Katie Joy]

The weather was quite changeable in the day, with at one point snow blowing across the ice surface under 25 knot winds (not ideal for landing a plane when you need to see the skiway contrast). However, the Otter landed at about 10 pm on the 18th Jan with pilot Ian and co-pilot Callam, uplifting us back west, where we had a late night camping out in a mountain tent on Berkner Island. The air was still, but cold with our hair freezing up turning us grey, and the surface was snowy and looking like a million sugar lumps. The next morning on the 19th we departed for Rothera via Fossil Bluff, landing around 7 pm.

Flying back over the Peninsula – mountain ranges emerge out of the ice. [Credit: Katie Joy]
Melt ponds forming as the sea ice melts near Fossil Bluff. [Credit: Katie Joy]

Everything was rapidly unloaded from the aircraft and shifted to various parts of the base to be organised — the meteorites to the freezer, the rubbish to the rubbish centre, our science cargo to its storage area be sorted, all the field gear to the Fuchs building (sorry guys for making it a mess). Utterly overwhelming to see so many people after the relative quietness and tranquillity of the field. Finding our rooms, quick shower, making it to the dining hall (just) for the end of service (lamb roast – amazing). I was scheduled on the Dash 7 flight north to Chile for 9 am the next morning on the 20th…  so had to run around to organise all of my personal kit separating it from the BAS borrowed field kit and making sure things were washed (sorry to my roommate Sarah who’s bedroom was suddenly inundated with stinking clothes and four bags of stuff tipped out on the floor – I hope the smell of kerosene and field grime is not lingering) and the science cargo to be shipped back north later this month, to be ready to leave. Ahhhhh… finally got a beer at the end of a long day. Then the next morning saying goodbye to people, heading north on the Dash, dinner in Punta, an early night and collection at 4 am today for the next flights back to the UK via Santiago and Sau Paulo.

Flying over the Andes on route out of Santiago airport. [Credit: Katie Joy]

So yes, its been a bit mad for the last few days and I am missing life of being at Outer Recovery whizzing around the ice spotting meteorites. Antarctica grabs you (well it has certainly has got to me) and doesn’t let you go — hopefully I will get a chance to come back someday to continue the search for more space rocks on the ice.

It has been amazing that in just two field seasons with such small teams we have collected over 100 surface stones for future scientific study by the cosmochemistry community and I am very proud of what we have achieved and look forward very much to finding out what types of meteorites we have collected. Over to the laboratory and curation team now for the next phase of the science story, and hopefully we can continue to source more funding and the support of BAS to get back out to the ice in the next few years to continue our scientific success.

Saying goodbye to our fieldsite. [Credit: Katie Joy]

More blogs posts to come when we have results in from the last season’s meteorite haul, and to update everyone on our science research paper outcomes.

Some thanks and shout outs from me at this stage:

  • The rest of the Sledge Victor Manchester fieldteam — Geoff, Wouter, and Romain who fought a determined fight with the metal detector panels, and found some great meteorites during surface search days. To the story of 118-218-119-119alpha.
  • Andy Smedley, our Man back in Manchester, who has been receiving our emails from the field to post the blog. [BTW – we named the 3rd blue detector panel sledge Sledge Smedley (mentioned in this previous blog) in his honour at not having him with us in Antarctica]. Whilst Sledge Smedley only had a few days out and about, he lived his life to the full bouncing around and at least still has an intact bottom.
  • The Twin Otter flight teams (Mark, Ian, Dutch, and Dave) and co-pilots from Rothera and Halley who have come out to visit us this season and help get us and plane fuel across the enormity of the continent. The Rothera field operations managers who work 3-d chess to try and get everyone in the right place on the right day working around the ever changeable weather. The Rothera science coordinator Maz who has been so brilliant in helping out with requests for boxes, getting our cargo together for shipment, and just being completely fab. Everyone at Rothera and Halley who works hard to just get stuff done.
  • And a special thanks to our wonderful team of field guides Julie, Taff and Rob who have kept us safe, organised camp, provided great chats and moral, and have helped us to find the meteorites we have collected. Thanks guys for putting up with us all for the different parts of the project you have worked on this year and last, its been a privilege to spend time with you.

Half the team is at Halley

Romain Tartese | 6 Dec 2019

After a bit more than a week there, Geoff and I left Rothera yesterday after lunch to start making our journey down to the meteorite search area. We boarded the AZ Twin Otter aircraft with field guide Rob and mechanic Tom (who is going to Halley where he’ll spend the next year or so!), and pilots Dutch and Mark (always better with pilots!). Between Rothera and Halley, we made several stops on the way, notably needed to refuel the Twin Otter.

The views leaving Rothera and Adelaide Island behind were fantastic. A couple of hours after leaving Rothera we first stopped at Fossil Bluff for a quick refill. Landing at Fossil Bluff was truly fantastic as you follow spectacular cliffs all the way down – see photo below.

Spectacular layered cliffs on the way down to Fossil Bluff [Credit: R. Tartese].

We then stopped at Sky Blu, where the Twin Otter lands on a blue ice runway. It was actually my first steps on the Antarctic continent, since both Rothera and Fossil Bluff are on islands off the coast.

Happy chaps having just landed at Sky Blu [Credit: G. Evatt].

After landing, we were met by three BAS colleagues that are stationed at Sky Blu for a few days or weeks. Readers who followed the blog last season will probably remember that Sky Blu is where Geoff spent some time last summer trying to break the metal detector assembly we will be towing on the ice, and perfecting his ice coring skills. We had a great dinner (thanks guys!) and a good night of sleep in our cosy (and very orange) pyramid tent.

Midnight sun at Sky Blu – the Twin Otter can be seen on the far left [Credit: R. Tartese].

After breakfast this morning, the weather forecast over the Ronne Ice Shelf and onto Halley was promising, so we set off at around 0830 to finish our journey to Halley station. And we were once again greeted by fantastic views all the way. After just under 3 hours, we stopped at the Three Ronne Depot (TRD) on the edge of the Ronne Ice Shelf to top up the Twin tanks with about 800 litres of fuel! It involved a very limited amount of digging to access the barrels – and as suggested by the photo below it was very balmy!

Refuelling at the Three Ronne Depot [Credit: R. Tartese].

The final leg of our journey took us from the Ronne Ice Shelf to Halley VI station that sits on the Brunt Ice Shelf , flying over spectacular patches of open sea and broken sea-ice, and as a bonus over a large colony of emperor penguins!

The edge of the Ronne Ice Shelf, viewed from an altitude of 3000 m. [Credit: R. Tartese].

After a long day flying we arrived in Halley where we have just enjoyed a great fish and chips dinner. Plans for the coming days are fluid, but it seems one of us will head off to the mountains tomorrow if the weather is good to start shifting some fuel around. In the meantime, Wouter might hopefully make his way down to Halley with the first half of the kit, then followed by Katie with the rest of the kit. Stay tuned!

The main module at Halley VI station [Credit: R. Tartese]

Hanging out at Halley

Katie Joy | 30 Dec 2018

A quick update – the weather has closed in around our field sites south of the Shackleton mountains, which means low cloud and poor contrast on the landing areas. It is also pretty overcast at Halley as well so we wont be flying out today. In Antarctica the work we do is dominated by the weather, so not a lot we can do but sit back and get on with a few other work tasks. We have packed up all the kit into our plane loads so that as soon as the weather clears we are ready to load and go — if not tomorrow, hopefully in a couple of days time. Send us good weather thoughts!

20181229_151216v2
Two person field kit for a four week field work plan (minus some additional skidoo fuel that will join us later on), loaded onto a large sledge ready to be dragged out to the skiway.

The plan of work for when we get into the field is to do a quick tour of several sites as a lightweight travel unit. We will return to a base camp each day, and in the day time head off with a skidoo each and a load of emergency kit in case of closing in weather conditions. After about a week or so we hope to do a longer traverse with all our kit piled onto three wooden Nansen style sledges , and head off to a different field area about 120 km away. This overland traverse is typically of BAS’s field team mobile work, and we will proceed as we access the terrain.

In terms of our field equipment — if you look back a few posts down you should see a photo of the pyramid style tents we will be using. A lot of the kit you can see in the photo above piled onto the sledge are items associated with the camp (boxes with a stove, cooking equipment, food supplies, field medical box, bags of camping kit including a sleeping bag and some nice mats to lie on in the tent) or skidoos (fuel, repair box). We will have a small generator so that we can generate power in the field to power our sat phones and GPS devices. We have some ice chippers and shovels for removal of snow and ice, and rescue equipment we will take with us each day in case of emergencies. And importantly we also have our science kit for collecting any meteorites we come across, and making sure they are bagged carefully.

It has taken a massive amount of logistical effort from many people at BAS to get us to this point — plane route flying and planning operations (and weather observation support), through to all the field guide planning and kit preparation, travel logistics, feeding me (!)  — an amazing amount of human hours and resources for which I and the rest of the meteorite project team back in Manchester and Cambridge are very grateful.

IMG_2851v2
Inside the belly of the Twin Otter — our flight over from Rothera to Halley. Two passengers sit in the front of the plane, with the cargo strapped down in the back. The big green bags you can see are our P-bags (personal kit bags) which include a sleeping back and other tent items to keep us cosy if we need to stop for a night somewhere. On our runs out to the field, we will likely do three Otter round trips as we need to take two large skidoos with us in the field, which require one flight each to fit into the plane.