An erratic few days

Katie Joy | 05 Jan 2020

A busy few days for us in the field. We covered a bit more ground with the metal detection panel array system on the main local ice field , but then suffered a few setbacks when the system powered up and down again in a run. Geoff and Wouter had a day of taking everything apart, assessing what was working and not working, and in progress we discovered that the blue sledge (we had nicknamed Sledge Evatt Junior*) that was carrying our control box and battery had a rather large whole in the bottom, which had been allowing snow to enter the base of the sledge dislodging some of the equipment. Needless to say Junior has been now been retired, and we need a name for the new blue sledge which has taken its place (number 3 doesn’t really have a ring to it).

An ice pond next to Halliday ridge: several of the local rocks had clearly sunk into the ice leaving interesting bubble trails during their descent. Alas no meteorites. [Credit: Katie Joy]
Looking along the ridge of Halliday Nunatak. [Credit: Katie Joy]

Whilst all the fixing up has been going on, Romain, Taff and I covered quite a lot of ground surface searching the northern most part of the ice field — finding 7 more meteorite stones throughout the day, including one (a stony type) that was almost completely buried within the ice, only about 10% sticking out of this surface. The clouds lifted and the afternoon was warm and glorious to work in.

Last night we had a good 20 knot wind sweep through the area clearing a lot of the snow off the blue ice surface. We all headed out as a group of five to visit the ice field closest to the Recovery Glacier — a trip of about 10 km from where we are camped. We travelled there linked up on skidoos — forming a caravan of skidoos and sledges trundling across the sastrugi snow heading north for about an hour. BAS fieldguide Julie Baum and I visited this icefield last year (it was the site of my epic skidoo breakdown), and it was good to revisit it. We searched the surface for a while, finding one more meteorite sample (adding to the three we found here last year).

Systematic search on ice. [Credit: Geoff Evatt]
Wouter and Taff near Halliday Nunatak. [Credit: Geoff Evatt]
Meteorite collection with tongs. [Credit: Geoff Evatt]
Geological search on Halliday Nunatak. [Credit: Geoff Evatt]

We also scaled the local nunatak — the only rocky outcrop in this area**, to collect some geological samples and to take in the view of the ice fields and how they extend northways abutting the Recovery Glacier itself (the boundary between the two features is impressive, with large ridges, crevasses and ice cliffs). We assume this is a first ascent — so will take this high with pride. The nunatak is formed of a weathered igneous rock (granodiorite), but has lots what we call ‘erratics’ (they are called erratics as they shouldn’t be there geologically speaking) all over the top that have been dropped from the bottom of a glacier which used to run over the rocky peak. Tomorrow we plan to return to the metal detection panel searching and see how sledge number 3 (we really do need a better name) holds up. May his bottom not be broken.

Group ascent of Halliday Nunatak. [Credit: Geoff Evatt]

* You might be wondering what/who is Sledge Evatt (i.e., the senior). Well this bold name was given to the blue sledge that was carrying the control equipment for the first sledge unit we set up. Alas, senior had to be retired a few days ago when he also developed a large hole on his underside, passing the responsibility onto junior…

** Recently we requested to name this site Halliday Nunatak after Dr Ian Halliday (1928-2018) who was a Canadian astronomer with expertise in meteor (asteroid and comet) delivery rates to the Earth. His research is related to our core science project of understanding Antarctic meteorite type, delivery rates and glacial transport processes.