And then there were two…

Katie Joy | 10 Jan 2020

It’s been a busy couple of days in the field as we wrap up at the end of the season. As Romain mentioned in his post, two days ago (8th Jan) we started to pack up camp ready for a move back to the skiway input site (about 2 km up the road). We were just settling into a quiet evening when we got a phone call to say that three of the team would be picked up by plane the next day. All hands to stations and we packed up camp that night and relocated so that we could be in place the next day. It was a late one by the time we went to bed, but it was good to know that the main work was out the way. In the morning we got word that the plane (trusty old Victor Bravo Charlie) had left Halley and was winging its way south to us.

The guys in the field before being collected. [Credit: Katie Joy]

Wouter, Geoff, and Romain then headed out with pilot Dave and co-pilot Tom Hulme (who helped out last year as well with our team’s collection from the field — thanks Tom!) towards Rothera, but were diverted on route and ended up last night with our friends at Halley Research Station where they could enjoy a nice warm shower and cooked dinner.

Meanwhile Taff and I have remained in the field ready for the next collection. Taff has been preparing a depot site where we can store the equipment that can’t be uplifted this year. There is a lot of work stacking up of boxes and kit, note taking, rearranging and making sure that everything will not blow away in the Antarctic winter when wind speeds can get up over 60 knots.

This afternoon we took a drive out to visit the southernmost ice field in the area where Julie and I visited last year, finding two meteorites in the process. It was a stunning drive to and from our camp site through flat white terrain, passing by the camp that Wouter, Geoff and Rob had been put into about a month ago. We drove past the remnants of their igloos: they have been dilapidated somewhat in the strong winds and now look like a beautiful ruins. Onwards to the ice field which we discovered was a lot less snow covered than last year, although some parts still had recent snow clinging to the surface. The winds there were much stronger than at camp with a lot of ice blowing along the surface, snaking its way to the west at ~30 knots. Blowy. We searched two of the main parts in a mix of systematic and recon style of search — alas no meteorites were found, but it was an absolute joy to drive around looking.

Remnants of the igloo at the guys original campsite. [Credit: Katie Joy]
Taff driving close to the ice rise at the southern ice field. [Credit: Katie Joy]

The journey back to camp was just as stunning — close to the ice field the wind was blowing hard whipping up and blowing snow, but then as we bridged a hill, it dropped off completely leaving a surface of hoar frost with ice crystals that glinted in the sunlight like a million diamonds. We weaved our way through this glittering landscape, kicking up snow crystals, making it look like the air itself was sparkling.

We await news of our uplift — but for now are enjoying being in this amazing landscape.