Hello from Outer Recovery!

Geoff Evatt | 19 Dec 2019

It has been a while since we gave an update on matters here, mainly because we have gone from prolonged inaction to lots of action. To recap, we (Wouter, Rob and I) were originally dropped in at the southern end of the Outer Recovery Ice Fields, but without skidoos.  This meant that any exploring was confined to a very short distance from the tent. And without a generator to charge our batteries, it meant occupying our time was slightly challenging. Once we had tested all we could with the science gear we had, we were left with no choice but to build an igloo (it is glorious). Adding to the amusement of matters is finding about one in ten of the dried food sachets gives instant food poisoning; when trapped in a three person tent this does add spice to life.

Then after a week, a couple of skidoos were brought out to us by pilots Dutch and Mark.  We were then free…. free to move to our intended camp location on a blue ice area in the middle latitudes of Outer Recovery.  Conscious of lots of crevasses, we slowly made our way there. It took two days to shift all of the science gear and camping stuff, but in so doing it allowed us to commence with the first stage of the project: testing the gear (yes, again). Without going into too many details yet, the electronic side of the system is not loving the conditions at present. The mechanical side is fairly relaxed and proving reliable enough. This means the next few days will be critical for us.

Field guide Rob tows the metal detector array across blue ice [Credit: Geoff Evatt]

Yet during the first trials of our equipment on the blue ice field, Rob suddenly gave a yell: a large black lump some 100m away. Yes, he had spotted our first meteorite! A real whopper as well. And as the day went on we found more and more (all within a couple of hours search time). As it stands we appear to have found, we think, some 8 meteorites — and five of them are relatively sizeable. We were all extremely excited to have found them and to be off the mark: we will not be going home empty handed!

One of the first meteorite finds [Credit: Geoff Evatt]
Off the mark. [Credit: Wouter van Verre]
Another! Rob Taylor with another ‘find’ from foot searching [Credit: Geoff Evatt]

As for everyone else? Well, it looks like we’re suddenly going to be all together tomorrow. The logistics behind this project have been huge (thank you all at BAS), and hopefully we’re near the end of the to’ing and fro’ing. All hands will then be focused on getting the camp fully set up, and then seeing what we can do with the detector system (our science tent will primarily be an electrical engineer workshop).

As for weather? Slightly mixed, but on the whole rather sunny. This certainly helped keep us sane during the close quarters camping. The temperatures are probably down towards –20ºC, although without any of us having a thermometer it’s a bit of a guess: when the nostril hairs freeze up (slightly) as you inhale, then you know it’s below –15.

We’ll be in touch again shortly with updates on sledge matters, and hopefully some more meteorite news.

In the meantime we will say goodbye to our field guide Rob Taylor, who Wouter and I have been fortunate to have look after us — especially his “Spamghetti” surprise dinner (can you guess the surprise?). Thank you Rob, you have been fantastic. He now heads back to Halley for a shower and some non freeze-dried food (he was only expecting to be out here a couple of nights) and gets swapped for field guide Taff.